Posts Tagged: middle-grade novels

‘The Rubber Band Slingshot Summer’ – It’s Here!

Rubber Band roadies, Kevin and Christy Hoss.

As I write this, Kevin and I are attending our first writer’s conference together, the Blue Ridge Mountains Christian Writer’s Conference.

While here, The Rubber Band Slingshot Summer (book three in the Rubber Band series) was officially birthed.

Childbirth is hard, but so is publishing a book. The fun part is writing; the hard part is refining, editing, communicating, cover art, and many other things that a reader may not realize happens before they hold the hard copy in their hands and turn the first page.

Most authors must do all the marketing themselves. I recently enjoyed marketing by sharing a booth with a family friend at a local fair.

I loved talking to interested readers and making connections which I hope will turn into speaking engagements.

The Rocky-as-Elvis prop drew interest, and I had a few posers.

One had to show off her Elvis tattoo.

Yes, It’s hard work to be a writer, but I love my dream career. No matter what pains I must go through, I am going to keep bringing my writing babies into the world.

My Visiting Author Trip to Kenwood School

I felt like a little girl on Christmas morning opening the biggest present, and finding exactly what she wanted!

When Sharon Watson, Kenwood School’s librarian, invited me to come do an author visit assembly, I was over-the-top thrilled. I taught at Kenwood for ten years and filled various creative roles. To me, it was the happiest place on earth to teach but I gave it up to pursue my writing dreams.

Facing the assembled children, I told the story of my journey since second grade. I didn’t bore them with lengthy tales of my history but encouraged them to keep hoping and dreaming and work hard at whatever their dream is, in order to make it come true.

Just for fun, I gave volunteers the opportunity to shoot rubber bands through holes on a game board, reminding them that shooting a rubber band is how Eddie got in trouble and they should only use rubber bands for their intended purpose or end up in the principal’s office.

The students had many great questions and I had to opportunity to speak to the fifth-grade class as they are doing a NANOWRIMO project.

It’s always a pleasure to watch the faces of the children as I sign books. But, just like a day ending at Disneyland, I didn’t want to leave the happiest place on earth. Alas, I must return to the hardest part of being an author – writing.

The Birth of a Book

When I was a second grader, my teacher, Mrs. Olson, told me I was destined to be a writer.

I wrote five pages about my dog and won first place in the writing contest Mrs. Olson created for her second-grade writers. That was in 1972 and I never forgot her words, always dreaming of becoming an author.There is no feeling more exhilarating than opening a box to find a dozen books with your name on the front. I compare the process to giving birth. There’s the conception, the long haul of putting words into story… and that is only the beginning.

For the most part, the process can take a lot longer than nine months of carrying a baby. Only writers can understand how much work it takes to finally hold your baby, the fruition of hard work in your hands: A book with your name on the over.

It begins with an idea.

Thanks to my friend Susan K. Stewart, who listened to my idea and said the three words authors love to hear, “Send it in,” I have a middle-grade book series.

The Rubber Band series by Christy Hoss

Susan and I became friends, and she shared with me her idea for a book that was burning on her heart. I loved her idea. I wish I could have said those three words to her, but because she is an editor, she had an “in” with the publisher.

Susan had a dream, one that involved her love of donkeys.

Recently, her dream was fulfilled. A box of books arrived at her doorstep and when she opened them up, her dream for Donkey Devos was born. I love it when dreams come true.

From idea to the page, from the page to pitching to a publisher, from the publisher to the editing process and from the editing process finally to print, writing is hard work.

But because I have dreamed of writing my entire life and recently birthed my second book, to me, the entire process truly is my labor of love.

My First Book Launch Party

Christy Hoss signing books

It finally happened! The party I had planned for my first book last year, The Rubber Band, took place for my second book, The Rubber Band Stretches: Rocky’s Story.

As COVID restrictions began to lift, thirty-plus people were able to enjoy fun, games, and prizes and tons of pizza at Joey’s Pizza (the very one mentioned in the books!). I ordered too much food, so many people went home with a large pizza, but that’s okay because Joey’s is the best pizza in my opinion.

Christy Hoss signing books

If you weren’t there, you missed out on the rubber band shooting game, searching for seven Lego Elvis hidden in plain sight, an ice-breaking Bingo game, photo opportunities to be Eddie on the first book’s cover, and posing with Rocky as Elvis, all earning tickets to put in the bag of your favorite raffle prize.

After all the activity and thanking everyone for their support, I sat down to sign books.

My “vision” photo

Years ago, when I dreamed of being an author, a friend of mine set up vision photos and I took mine, pretending to sign books. That photo came to life, my dream came true, and for the first time, I felt like a real author.

The day’s activities blurred together; I can hardly remember it. But one thing I sticks out that I’ll never forget: the people I love who helped me fulfill my second-grade dream of being a writer honored me by celebrating my victory. For that reason, I am truly grateful.

Fun Facts about Rocky ‘Roadkill’ Espinosa (Main Character in ‘The Rubber Band Stretches’)

Rocky’s real name is Rockefeller Espinosa. His middle name has not yet been revealed. He has an older brother and baby sister but does not remember them.

His ex-con father, Eduardo, gave him a picture of the three siblings, telling Rocky the children were the reason he made it through his long days in prison.

Rocky is in the foster care system, currently living with the Perkins and their baby girl, Rosie. Rocky loves Rosie and dreams of being adopted by the Perkins. His foster mom, Mary, makes the best, ooey, gooey, chocolate chip cookies. (Check out her recipe here)

Rocky always carries his drumsticks wherever he goes. Everyone thought Rocky was a bully as he keeps to himself, walking the perimeter of the school during recess.

Eddie Taylor invited Rocky to join the band as their drummer and has become Rocky’s best friend. When Eddie became a diabetic, Eddie thought diabetes meant ending the dream of the band winning the Sun Valley talent contest.

Rocky persuades Eddie to not give up with these words:

“The only way to survive the bad notes life sings to you is to keep playing until the music is in key again.”

Rocky became a fan of Elvis while doing research for his 4th grade living biography report. Drumming isn’t Rocky’s only talent; he can also impersonate Elvis and wooed the mayor at her 50th birthday party.

Rocky’s Elvis Spotify Playlist

If you want to hear music the Rubber Band plays and Rocky’s favorite Elvis tunes, check them out on Spotify.

Fun Fact from the Author

Rocky’s character is based on an actual student.

Mary Perkins’ Cookie Recipe

Bakery Style Chocolate Chip Cookies

The Rubber Band Stretches

The Rubber Band series by Christy Hoss

Why the Rubber Band?

The Rubber Band Stretches by Christy Hoss

As I sat in the front row keeping an eye on my students, the stage curtain opened to our elementary school assembly. A sign over the group declared, “The Rubber Band.”

With one stroke, the lead guitar caused my inner groupie to emerge. I screamed in delight and crooned out, “Born to Be Wild,” along with the kid band delivering professional sounds. Our usually reserved staff soon joined me in my whoops of delight and the band had the entire assembly on its feet, dancing and clapping.

The Rubber Band by Christy HossI was so impressed by this rock-and-roll group of fourth and fifth grade students that I asked them to play at my fiftieth birthday party.

Returning to our classroom, I put on my writer’s hat, thinking about what a cool kid’s book The Rubber Band would make. But I had to come up with a plotline. It was then I noticed a rubber band on the floor and knew instantly what needed to be done.

My book had to be about a good guitar-playing kid getting trouble for a mis-shot rubber band. He’s sent to the principal’s office, where he sees the sign advertising the talent contest and he begins his quest to recruit a diverse group of misfit kids to form a garage band.

Characters inspired by real people

My imagination took off as I thought about the many children I have taught through the years. Most of my characters are inspired by those actual students and events.

Rocky is a fictional name given to a real foster kid who came to our school temporarily. He used to walk alone around the perimeter of the school boundaries – just like Rocky.

Edison and Oliver are actual names of maternal twins I taught my first year at Kenwood Elementary, the school I derived Wildwood elementary from. Even Principal Haymaker is based on my friend, Principal Bales.

The Rubber Band Stretches by Christy HossThe band is not without troubles and Eddie soon finds himself challenged by an incurable illness. But the bond of the band is strong, and they will not snap but hang tight to see the dream through, no matter how it turns out.

Rocky longs to be a part of a permanent family, but has his heartstrings pulled when his freshly paroled birth father shows up.

Becca is the lonely, spoiled-rotten rich girl with no friends but a voice of gold.

Manny plays bass and Oliver, the keyboards, but not without adding their own unique personalities to the mix.

You’ll be hearing more from The Rubber Band, as I plan to write about their adventures into adulthood and beyond…and there will be many adventures.

I no longer look at a rubber band and think of it as just an elastic ring to hold things together. It’s a simple, useful object that inspired a novel series.

Here’s a video that introduces you to The Rubber Band Stretches: